Notation FAQ

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There are plenty of notations for juggling patterns, especially passing patterns. passingwiki.org uses which ever one is best suited.

Contents

Causal diagram

Theory

Causes and clubs

How to check jugglability?

Reading off the patterns details from the causal diagramm

How many passers

Number of clubs

Throws

How to start

Designing causal diagrams

Details on how to enter causal diagrams into passingwiki.org are found in the documentation of the causal generator.


Prechac notation

Theory

Prechac transformation

How to check jugglability?

Reading off (some) patterns details in Prechac notation

How many passers

This important information is usually provided alongside the Prechac siteswap.

3p1 is an example for a Prechac siteswap which fits to any numbers of passers greater or equal two.

Number of clubs

Throws

How to start

Deriving the causal diagram from Prechac notation

4-handed-Siteswaps

Theory

The difference to solo juggling siteswaps is, that all the four hands of two jugglers are counted. If you take R for a right hand and L for a left hand and 1 or 2 for the first or the second juggler, the hands always throw alternatingly: R1 R2 L1 L2. Now you can take an existing juggable siteswap, for example 786. (You should avoid siteswaps containing a 1 or a 3.)
R1 R2 L1 L2 R1 R2 L1 L2 R1 R2 L1 L2
7 . 8 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 6
This is 7 club French 3-count.

The numbers

Each number says, when the club will be thrown the next time. Example for a club thrown with the right hand of juggler 1:
0: empty hand
2: R1 to L1, hand across (zip)
4: R1 to R1, you can simply keep the club where it is or do a fast flip with the club (hold)
5: R1 to R2, quick crossing passes for juggler 1, quick straight passes for juggler 2, no spin (zap)
6: R1 to L1, normal self, single spin (self)
7: R1 to L2, floaty single pass, straight for juggler 1, crossing for juggler 2
8: R1 to R1, double self to the same hand, (heff)
9: R1 to R2, floaty double pass, crossing for juggler 1, straight for juggler 2
a: R1 to L1, triple self
b: R1 to L2, floaty triple pass, straiht for juggler 1, crossing for juggler 2

the global and the local pattern

If you take the global pattern, it would be a valid siteswap for solo juggling, for example 786. You get the local pattern, if you take every second number. In this example, juggler 1 does 768 and juggler 2 does 876. You get this by taking the numbers under R1, L1, R1, L1, ... for juggler 1 and the numbers under R2, L2, R2, L2, ... for juggler 2. An easy way from global to local is to write the siteswap twice: 786786 an the write it again, moving every second number downwards:
7.6.8.
.8.7.6
The first row is what juggler 1 does, the second row, what juggler 2 does. The local pattern is normally not a valid siteswap for two hands anymore, but that is what you have to do, if you want to pass a pattern.
If you have the local pattern and you want to transform it into the global pattern, write it down with spaces between the numbers 7.6.8. and fill the spaces with the same local pattern, but starting in the second half (juggler 2 does the same, but starts half a period later (round up if the period of the pattern is odd). So you fill the spaces with .8.7.6 in this example.

Causal Diagram

Our example as a causal diagram looks like this:


causal2

transformation to Prechac

To transform a 4-handed siteswap to Prechac-Notation, just take the local pattern and divide each number by two and write a P behind the passes. Our example 786 becomes 3.5P 4 3.

transformation from Prechac to 4-handed siteswap

A Prechac pattern is only transformable into a 4-handed siteswap, if every natural number 3, 4 or 5 is a self and every half number 2.5P, 3.5P or 4.5P is a pass. Double every number of the Prechac-pattern and leave the P away. Now all the odd numbers are the passes and all the even numbers are the selfes.
In our example 3.5P 3 4 becomes 7 6 8, which is the local 4-handed siteswap.

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